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Archive for the ‘Learning’ Category

Babies who had heard the recordings showed the neural signal for recognizing vowel and pitch changes in the pseudoword, and the signal was strongest for the infants whose mothers played the recording most often. They were also better than the control babies at detecting other differences in the syllables, such as vowel length. “This leads us to believe that the fetus can learn much more detailed information than we previously thought,” Partanen says, and that the memory traces are detectable after birth.”This is a well-respected group and the effects are really convincing,” says Patricia Kuhl, a neuroscientist at the University of Washington in Seattle. Combined with previous work, she says, these results suggest “that language learning begins in the womb.”

via Babies Learn to Recognize Words in the Womb | Science/AAAS | News.

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Drinking as little as half a pint of beer per week during pregnancy can cut a baby’s intelligence by several IQ points.

via Moderate drink during pregnancy can lower baby’s IQ – health – 15 November 2012 – New Scientist.

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UCLA researchers have�discovered that�the activity of a brain region known to be involved in learning, memory and Alzheimer’s disease behaves as if it’s remembering something during sleep, even under anesthesia — a finding that counters conventional theories about memory consolidation during sleep.

His team found that the entorhinal cortex showed what is called persistent activity, which is thought to mediate working memory during waking life — for example, when people pay close attention to remember things temporarily, such as recalling a phone number or following directions.

“The big surprise here is that this kind of persistent activity is happening during sleep, pretty much all the time.” Mehta said. “These results are entirely novel and surprising. In fact, this working memory-like persistent activity occurred in the entorhinal cortex even under anesthesia.”

The findings are important, Mehta said, because humans spend one-third of their lives sleeping and a lack of sleep results in adverse effects on health, including learning and memory problems.

via The sleeping brain behaves as if it’s remembering something | KurzweilAI.

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Marissa Mayer chose to major in what she describes as “symbolic systems”, which are a combination of these 4 disciplines: 

–philosophy (how do people reason?) 
–cognitive psychology (how do people learn?) 
–linguistics (how do people communicate?) and 
–computer science (can a computer do the same or assist people in doing these things?) 

That kind of thinking appears to set you up pretty well to be a product manager for a company that creates software to assist human minds in reaching a greater potential. (video 1.3hour) via http://www.quora.com/Stanford-University/What-is-it-about-the-Symbolic-Systems-program-at-Stanford-that-produces-such-amazing-alums#ans1399154

via An Evening with Marissa Mayer – YouTube.

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“These multi-session adult courses share the latest research on the neuroscience, psychology, and evolution of human behavior. With the help of expert guest speakers, online resources, documentary footage, and in-class projects, students will learn how to be critical consumers of scientific research and news reporting—all in a small, discussion-based setting”
http://www.amnh.org/learn-teach/adults/sackler-brain-bench

via Sackler Brain Bench.

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“Cells that fire together, wire together.”

 

via Hebbian theory – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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